‘Linnaeus’ & Botanical work

Installation at Museum of Garden History at part of 'Diversions' with Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art
Installation at Museum of Garden History at part of ‘Diversions’ with Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art

Inspired by Carl Linnaeus’s famously inaccurate ‘Sexual System’ of classification and its illustration by Ehret in 1750, these exuberant sculptures investigate some elaborate displays of a variety of plant forms through hand-drawn lamp-worked glass.

shown at Museum of Garden History as part of 'Diversions' with Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art
shown at Museum of Garden History as part of ‘Diversions’ with Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art

Linnaeus’s plant taxonomy proposed many ‘groupings’ that seemed morally ‘unnatural’ to his peers and were considered extremely controversial in his day. Although later systems of classification largely employed more morphological evidence, his binomial system of nomenclature and his hierarchical system of classification, although modified, has remained standard for over 200 years.

The stamen works were originally created in response to Ehret’s famous illustrations held at the The Museum of Garden History. They formed part of a group exhibition ‘Diversions’ curated by Danielle Arnaud Contemporary Art.

This series then extended and expanded to include additional botanical works in response to exhibitions at The Linnean Society of London’s celebrations of Carl Linnaeus’s 300th anniversary and The Dissenters’ Chapel gallery  at Kensal Green Cemetery in 2007 (one of Britain’s oldest and most beautiful public burial grounds).

These stamen are drawn with coloured borosilicate glass using traditional ‘lamp working’ techniques and may be assembled on stems trimmed to fit or stand in specific locations or inside specially made bell jars. The stamen heads vary in size, colour and configuration , with the largest measuring approx. 5 x 5 x 6cm. You can commissioned your own with (or without) bespoke bell jars ( see above).

‘seed’, 2007